Wire Private Messenger

Wire Private Messenger is my new favorite encrypted messaging service. It is rapidly replacing Signal in my day-to-day use, though it will be a long time before it replaces Signal entirely. There are a lot of things to recommend this relative newcomer. Continue reading “Wire Private Messenger”

ProtonMail Two-Factor and Single Password Mode

Two days ago, ProtonMail released version 3.6. A number of new features were added in this release. The biggest one is long-awaited: two-factor authentication. Another new feature that interested me is ProtonMail’s new single password mode. Continue reading “ProtonMail Two-Factor and Single Password Mode”

Complete Privacy & Security Podcast E007

Complete Privacy & Security Podcast Episode 007: Email Strategies

Our seventh episode of The Complete Privacy & Security Podcast is now available. In this episode, we discuss our recommended Email strategies for Privacy & Security. Continue reading “Complete Privacy & Security Podcast E007”

PrivNote Self-Destructing Messages

I recently found a service that I enjoy using.  It is called PrivNote and it allows you to transmit small bits of encrypted text via a URL.  Here is how it works.  First navigate to https://privnote.com.  The very simple interface offers you a compose pane and prompts you to “Write your note here…”  You enter your message and click “Create Note”.  Your note is encrypted and you are given a URL that you can share with the intended recipient.  Privnote does not transmit the link for you – it is your responsibility to copy it and paste it into an email, text message, etc.  Once you have sent the note the real fun begins. Continue reading “PrivNote Self-Destructing Messages”

Redundant Secure Messengers

I have previously written about multiple secure messaging systems.  On the text/IM front I have covered Signal, Silent Circle, Wickr, and Threema.  For voice communication I have talked about Signal and Silent Phone.  Email options I have covered include ProtonMail, Tutanota, and old-fashioned PGP.  I am sometimes asked why I cover so many different systems.  Even I have recommended picking one or two and sticking with them. From a blogging standpoint, I want to give the reader as many options as possible.  From a personal/actual-use standpoint, my reasoning is slightly different.  I feel there are good reasons to employ redundant secure messengers. Continue reading “Redundant Secure Messengers”

My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 5: Use Cases

At this point, my ultra-private iPod phone is setup and ready to use.  If you choose to follow a similar course, it is important to define how you will actually employ the device before you start to use it.  This will also dictate the tradecraft you should undertake to support your use case.  As I see it, there are essentially two ways this device can be used. Both will make you more private and secure.  It is up to you to decide how far you need – or want – to take it.

Continue reading “My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 5: Use Cases”

My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 4

At this point in the process, the iPod has been initally setup, and the settings modified to make it as organically secure as possible.  At this point it is necessary to fund the iTunes account.  Even if you only plan to use free applications, the account must be funded before you can download apps.  The smallest denomination gift card you can purchase is $10 (I was unable to find anything below $15).

Continue reading “My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 4”

My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 3

Yesterday’s post covered the initial device setup for my Private iPod Phone.  Today’s post will go through the settings that impact privacy and security.  The goal of these settings is to make the device as inherently hardened as possible.  These changes are designed to lower the footprint of the iPod by limiting the amount of information it transmits, making it less trackable, and generally less “noisy”.  These are all important factors to me when creating my ultra-private iPod phone.  Many of these settings can also be applied to your iPhone. Continue reading “My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 3”

My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 2

Welcome back to Part 2 of my attempt to create a private and secure iPod phone!  When I started this series I thought it would consist of three parts: procurement, setup, and use.  Setup took far more time than I expected, however, so I am going to cover this stage of the process somewhat more slowly.  One of the reasons I wanted to do this experiment was to see what roadblocks I might run into.  True to form, I ran into a couple of problems right off the bat.  This post will cover setting up the iPod phone intially, and modifying basic settings for privacy and security.

Continue reading “My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 2”

My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 1

Some time ago I read an amazingly good article on using an iPod Touch as a secure/private phone.  I love the idea, and I have thought about it for quite a while.  An iPod Touch is remarkably similar to an iPhone, but potentially far more private and secure.  Recently I decided to try it for myself and see how easy (or hard) it would be to set up.  I also had unanswered questions about its actual use.  Part 1 of this article will cover device procurement and the lengths I went to for anonymity’s sake.  Part 2, 3, and 4 will cover setup, and Part 5 will cover actually using my new, ultra-secure and private iPod phone. Continue reading “My Ultra-Private iPod Phone 1”