ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part III: Security Features

I have been using ProtonMail full-time for over five years, and recommending it for almost six. This blog is littered with references to it, along with several incremental updates. A lot has changed since ProtonMail’s beginnings; this post will cover some features of ProtonMail’s premium plans: aliases and custom addresses, custom domains, multiple users, and more. Continue reading “ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part III: Security Features”

ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part II: Tiers & Paid Features

I have been using ProtonMail full-time for over five years, and recommending it for almost six. This blog is littered with references to it, along with several incremental updates. A lot has changed since ProtonMail’s beginnings; this post will cover some features of ProtonMail’s premium plans: aliases and custom addresses, custom domains, multiple users, and more. Continue reading “ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part II: Tiers & Paid Features”

ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part I: The Basics

I have been using ProtonMail full-time for over five years, and recommending it for almost six. This blog is littered with references to it, along with several incremental updates. A lot has changed since ProtonMail’s beginnings. This post will cover the basics of ProtonMail: how it encrypts your data-in-motion, data-at-rest, and some other features. Continue reading “ProtonMail Five Years Later, Part I: The Basics”

OPSEC for Legal Marijuana Consumers

The commercial sale of legal, recreational marijuana in the United States poses some interesting legal problems. Marijuana is completely legal under the laws of some states, but still a Schedule I substance according to federal law. Though the strange detente that has emerged over the past several years has kept things awkwardly civil, the federal government would be legally justified in cracking down on growers, purveyors. . . and consumers. Continue reading “OPSEC for Legal Marijuana Consumers”

Five Steps to Protecting Your Home Address

Achieving comprehensive personal privacy is a complicated goal involving a lot of complex, discrete steps. On this blog I spend a lot of time focusing on the highly specific, individual steps. Often we fail to provide a lot of context for why we’re doing them, or how they fit into the bigger picture. This was called to my attention recently when an old friend contacted me. He has a legitimate safety reason to wish to be more private, and asked me for advice. Unfortunately, I don’t have a single blog post I could offer him that effectively introduces the basic steps of protecting your home address. Continue reading “Five Steps to Protecting Your Home Address”

Smartphone Bluetooth Interface Security

This post is a continuation of the series on smartphone interfaces and will cover Bluetooth interface security. Let me begin by saying that Bluetooth security is not as bad as it once was. As with the other articles in the series I will cover both the security and privacy concerns around this interface. Continue reading “Smartphone Bluetooth Interface Security”

DeleteMe – Privacy for Hire?

As readers here know, I really like Abine’s privacy service, Blur. What you may not know is that Abine also offers a service to protects privacy in another way. DeleteMe is Abine’s automated “opt-out” service. If you have read Hiding From the Internet or The Complete Privacy and Security Desk Reference, you know that opting out yourself can be frustrating and time consuming. The allure of services like these is in their convenience. You pay for the service, then carry on with life. Within a few months, your stuff is gone. Or so they say. I decided that I want to see for myself how services like this work, so I reached out to DeleteMe… Continue reading “DeleteMe – Privacy for Hire?”

Vehicle Privacy and Security

After hearing my recent interview with Aaron on the In the Rabbit Hole Urban Survival Podcast a couple weeks ago, I realized that I’ve yet to talk about vehicle privacy and security. For those of us in North America, vehicles are a way of life. Vehicles present some unique privacy and security challenges. In this post I’m going to talk about a few things you can do to improve vehicle privacy and security. Most requires some minor behavioral modification. Continue reading “Vehicle Privacy and Security”

ProtonMail Premium Review

Email is a service that we all rely on. Finding an email provider that promises a good balance of privacy, security, and convenience is a fraught proposition, however. As readers here doubtlessly know, I have huge privacy concerns around email. I hate giving out my real email address if possible, because it equates to attack surface (more on this later). I also hate using the same email for multiple services, but this creates major convenience problems. And I can’t store email with providers that either a.) dont’ store my data securely or b.) store it securely but scrape it for marketing purposes. Readers here also know I am a big fan of ProtonMail. This is why I decided to give ProtonMail Premium a try. Continue reading “ProtonMail Premium Review”

Tattoos, Tattoo Recognition, and Privacy

When I was a kid, people with tattoos were pretty few and far between.  If you had ink there was a good chance you’d been in the military or jail.  If you had tattoos on your hands, head, or neck you had almost certainly been to jail, or were, at very least, somone people didn’t want to mess with. These days a guy (or girl) with knuckle tattoos is just as likely to be a barista or art major as an ex-con.  A recent Harris poll estimates that 1 in 3 Americans has a tattoo, and half of millenials have them. Continue reading “Tattoos, Tattoo Recognition, and Privacy”