Your Ultimate Security Guide: iOS

I am thrilled to announce the upcoming August 20th release of Your Ultimate Security Guide: iOS!  The second book in the series, Your Ultimate Security Guide: iOS is intended to help the layman with both basic digital security and in the development of a comprehensive digital security perimeter.  Written in plain English, Your Ultimate Security Guide: iOS takes a step-by-step approach to enhancing mobile device security, and will help you reclaim some privacy in both the physical and digital realms.

Your Ultimate Security Guide IOS - 3DSome of the techniques readers of this book will understand how to employ include:

  • Harden the iOS operating system by manipulating nearly every setting that impacts security and/or privacy
  • Use password managers to create and use strong usernames, passwords, and to employ two-factor authentication
  • Use apps that provide end-to-end encryption for your text, voice, email, and chat communications, and take steps to mitigate location tracking and other metadata collection
  • Use “disposable” phone numbers to protect your real number from data marketers, telemarketers, and lower your online profile
  • Lock down your Wi-Fi network and protect your internet traffic using virtual private networks
  • Replace a variety of insecure native apps with security- and privacy-focused alternatives
  • Protect your sensitive online accounts through a comprehensive, systematic approach
  • Employ best practices to lower online exposure and minimize your attack surface

Look for Your Ultimate Security Guide: iOS on Amazon on August 20th.

USB Flash Drives

Since YUSG: Win7 was released, several of you have asked which USB flash drives I prefer.  There are two that I use on a daily basis for my backups, the Kingston Data Traveler and the SanDisk Cruzer Fit.

The Kingston Digital DataTraveler SE9 64GB USB 2.0 Flash Drive. I like this flash drive because it is rugged and can survive life on my keychain; I have had the same one for almost eighteen months now and it is still going strong. There is a new version that is USB 3.0 capable but I have yet to try it (link HERE).  Though I am quite certain it performs, the redesigned keychain hole doesn’t look as sturdy.  I intend to get my hands on one in the coming weeks and report back.

The other USB flash drive I use is the SanDisk Cruzer Fit CZ33 64GB USB 2.0 Low-Profile Flash Drive. This flash drive is low-profile enough to remain in my USB port full-time and does not snag when taking my laptop in and out of a bag. I have two of these, and one of the two is always in my machine being backed up by CryptSync and the other is at my offsite backup location. There is also a USB 3.0 version of this drive available and I have tried it but do not prefer it because it is much larger and sticks out much further (link HERE). This is probably not an issue if you primarily utilize a desktop PC or travel with your laptop infrequently.

All three of the flash drives I use for backups are full-disk encrypted with TrueCrypt.

The 64 Gb versions of the SanDisk Cruzer Fit (left) and the Kingston Data Traveler.
The 64 Gb versions of the SanDisk Cruzer Fit (left) and the Kingston Data Traveler.