Privacy and Security Considerations when Upgrading to Windows 10

With free upgrades to Windows 10 fully out in the wild the migration to the new OS has been, by all accounts, a resounding success for Microsoft.  Though Windows 7 will doubtlessly remain king of the hill for the immediate future, with 75 million downloads in the last month Win10 is making serious inroads.  Though popular out of the gate, it has not been received without some legitimate complaint.  There are some major privacy issues with the new OS.

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Express Settings:  When going through the  upgrade process, do NOT choose the “Express settings” option.  In Express settings mode you are not allowed the opportunity to change privacy and security settings and they are set to defaults.  Worse, allowing the Express settings can cause an encrypted version of your Wi-Fi password to be shared with your friends through Wi-Fi Sense so they can use your Wi-Fi if and when they are at your house.  Instead choose the “Customize settings” option.

Forced Updates:  Perhaps the fiercest complaint about Win10 is that updates are mandatory, not optional.  While I strongly encrourage staying up-to-date, the ability to opt-out of select updates should be everyone’s right.  This ability is especially importan when updates are buggy or cause system instability as has been the case with some updates for 10.  Windows 10 users have no choice in the matter, though.  At least now Windows actually offers some transparency and explains what these updates do.  Before upgrading you should seriously consider whether you are willing to accept mandatory updates whether you want them or not.

Privacy Policy:  Windows 10’s privacy policy has been described by Ars Technica as “the new normal“.  While all operating systems send some information back some information the data collected and transmitted by Windows 10 is fairly significant by comparison but is, as Ars also points out, part of a continuing evolution of increasing data collection.

Data Collection by Default:  Windows 10’s data collection is enabled on the OS by default.  The new Cortana feature (the competitor to Apple’s Siri and Google’s Now) constantly records you and your actions to “get to know you”.  Windows 10 also has a very intuitive, very user-friendly Settings menu that contains a well laid-out Privacy section (shown below).  Unfortunately most of these privacy settings are enabled to collect data by default.  I strongly recommend going through these privacy settings immediately upon installing the new OS.  These settings are not complete; there are .  For more information on setting up the initial Privacy and Security settings in Windows 10 visit https://fix10.isleaked.com/.

Screenshots of my Win1o Privacy settings are attached a the end of this post.  Note that for most of these settings you must enable the global setting before disabling individual apps.  After you have disabled every app I recommend once again disabling the global settings.  Also note that these settings are not a substitute for using basic best practices and security utilities like encyrption and antivirus.

Some good news:  Windows 10 will still work with the security applications we know and love, like TrueCrypt, Password Safe, and others.  In fact, aside from OS-specifics, nearly everything I detailed in Your Ultimate Security Guide: Windows 7 Edition is still applicable.  Just one quick word of warning: if you are full-disk encrypted, DECRYPT YOUR HARD DRIVE before upgrading and re-encrypt upon completion of the upgrade.  I learned this the hard way.

Everyone loves the appeal of a new operating system.  Even I was excited at the prospect of an entirely new look when the computer finally finished installing 10.  But the more rational side of me dislikes change just for the sake of change.  After I complete the next installment of the Your Ultimate Security Guide series which will cover Windows 10 (look for it in March 2016) I plan to revert back to either Windows 7 or, much more likely, go full-time with a Linux distro.

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