OPSEC for Legal Marijuana Consumers

The commercial sale of legal, recreational marijuana in the United States poses some interesting legal problems. Marijuana is completely legal under the laws of some states, but still a Schedule I substance according to federal law. Though the strange detente that has emerged over the past several years has kept things awkwardly civil, the federal government would be legally justified in cracking down on growers, purveyors. . . and consumers. Continue reading “OPSEC for Legal Marijuana Consumers”

Redundant Secure Messengers

I have previously written about the desirability of having multiple secure messaging systems.  On the text/IM front I have covered Signal, Silent Circle, Wickr, Wire, and Threema.  For voice communication I have talked about Signal and Silent Phone Wire.  Email options I have covered include ProtonMail, Tutanota, and old-fashioned PGPContinue reading “Redundant Secure Messengers”

Wire Ephemeral Messages Update

Just over a month ago I wrote a full review of Wire Secure Messenger. Two weeks later I wrote an update explaining how Wire had integrated support for two security/privacy-focused browsers: Brave and Snowhaze. Two weeks later I find myself writing a second update. This time Wire ephemeral messages have changed in a couple big ways. Continue reading “Wire Ephemeral Messages Update”

Wire iOS Update: Brave & Snowhaze Support

Recently I wrote a full review of Wire Secure Messenger. One of my complaints in the article was the lack of support for integrated browsers other than Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. I am happy to report that based (at least in part) on that article Wire now offers support for both Brave and Snowhaze. Continue reading “Wire iOS Update: Brave & Snowhaze Support”

Extreme Uses of Privacy.com Part II

In my last article I discussed how I use Privacy.com cards on very regular basis. My hope is to inspire you to use privacy cards in as many facets of your daily life as possible. That being said, using privacy cards in person is hardly sunshine and rainbows. I have had some failures along the way (besides the Double Supreme Extra Cheese Incident), resulting in some rather awkward situations. Continue reading “Extreme Uses of Privacy.com Part II”

Big Changes to Private Internet Access iOS

I have been a fan of Private Internet Access for a long time. Back in December I began looking at some other VPN options for iOS. This was due to one major limiting feature: the PIA iOS app did not support OpenVPN. This has changed recently and the Private Internet Access iOS app is now better than ever. Continue reading “Big Changes to Private Internet Access iOS”

Book Review: Hunting El Chapo

I have used Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman as a case study for cell phone interception in my classes for several years. Only now do I have the full story of how the world’s most notorious drug trafficker was brought down due to his reliance on electronic communications. If you have an interest in how government agencies exploit cell phone activity you should read Hunting El Chapo by Andrew Hogan. The technical specifics are dated but the concepts, like link and network analysis, are not. Continue reading “Book Review: Hunting El Chapo”

Extreme Uses of Privacy.com

Note: This is a guest post from my friend Scrappy. We’ve met in person a couple of times and he has really impressed me with his dedication to privacy, and pushing the limits of Privacy.com. He wanted to share some of his experiences and I am very appreciative.

Ever since I listened to Episode 15 of the Complete Privacy & Security (CPS) Podcast I have been hooked on private payments. For those of you that are new to the privacy world and have not heard of privacy.com,  it’s a free service that allows an individual to create masked debit card numbers. These can be used to make purchases without companies knowing who you bank with and your individual debit/credit card numbers. Continue reading “Extreme Uses of Privacy.com”